Another community hub lost: Depanneur Poirier closes down

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by: 

Kate Aley

Depanneur Poirier, at the intersection of the highway and Ch. des Pères-Dominicains, has closed. The last day of business was Thursday 22 but the owners, Janet and Jack Deschenes have been emptying shelves for weeks.

The Deschenes have operated the store for ten years. According to Jack, business, always slow in winter, was further affected by the amount of houses damaged by the flooding last year.

"Once the races stop and the cottages close, by the time October comes, that's it," said Janet. "Without tourism, there's no business."

When their lease for the store came up for renewal, the couple decided to close the business and retire.

"So many people have come in over the past weeks and said how much they will miss us," said Jack. "During the floods, we bent over backwards to help people. We always said 'no credit' but sometimes we did give credit. Some didn't come back but most did. Some people even came to the house if the store was closed to drop off the money."

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas: Luskville craft bazaar

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by: 

Kate Aley

Slippery driving and chilly weather did not deter participants from attending the annual craft bazaar and breakfast event at the Luskville Community Centre on Sunday, November 19th.

To Paris with paint: Luskville artist invited to French Salon

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by: 

Kate Aley

Luskville painter Linda Bergeron Baril will be flying to France next month to show three paintings at the Carrousel du Louvre at a show hosted by the Société​ Nationale Des Beaux Arts from December 7 to 10.

Le jour du Souvenir 2017 au cénotaphe de Quyon

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by: 

Kate Aley

translation: 

Guy Faubert

Malgré les pluies torrentielles, les habitants de Pontiac ont gardé un silence respectueux lors de la cérémonie du jour du Souvenir au Cénotaphe de Quyon le 5 novembre.

Not Lyme: woman struggles to recover after tick bite

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by: 

Kate Aley

Two months ago, Ottawa high-school teacher Julia Brown* was a healthy woman enjoying a summer day at a riverside cottage. Yet a bite from a tick nearly took her life. But it was not Lyme disease; it was something worse.

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