Election 2017: Garry Dagenais

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

Our next profile is with Garry Dagenais, running to become councilor for Ward 2.

Born, raised

Born and raised in Beechgrove.

Profession

Office manager at L&J Towing.

Previous experience on council

I was councilor for Ward 4 for 7 years, beginning 2008.

What is the greatest challenge facing the Municipality?

The lack of communication by council. There’s no harmonization in this municipality. Big time. It’s a problem that council creates, we don’t seem to have harmony on council and without that, trust me, you don’t go forward too fast. When I was council, I sat in the middle; I was the deciding vote for a lot of stuff. It’s not just this current council; there’s always been a division between the wards. We need good leadership, good councilors who are actually there for the right reasons. If you are going run for council, you have to run for the people; your personal agenda can’t be for your gain, it has to be for the municipality.

If elected, what is the first thing you would like to do?

Work on infrastracuture, including the water and sewers [...] and our roads: they need to be upgraded. My previous experience on council will help with finding funds. We still struggle with [Quyon's water] as it was never planned out right; the whole infrastructure was not planned. If we have a water break, [we] do not have shut-off valves for each street. If there’s a break, we need to shut down the whole town to fix it. It’s not a simple fix: the sewer lines are 50 years old, there has never been any major upgrade in all that time. A lot of the paved roads have not been maintained. But it goes hand in hand: are you going to spend a lot of money until you fix water and sewers? [We must] decide on the priorities.

What is going right in this area?

[We are] starting to work with the NCC and our officials, Andre Fortin and Will Amos. That has changed; we are starting to be able to work together to get a lot of improvements. We never seemed to get any progress, no matter who was there before; we seem to have better communication between our elected officials now. I think that we should be able to get more funding for the municipality so long as they understand what we need. Priorities need to be made clear [to them]. Even with the MRC (des Collines), [there was] a lack of communication the long term, especially on Schema and getting stuff done for our municipality. That has been improving.

Why did you decide to run for council again?

My passion. Simple. It’s my community, I believe in it. We can develop this [place] but need the right people with passion who are willing to put time into it.  I ran for council the first time as I had always volunteered in the municipality and I figured I could make better changes by running for council. My record stands on what I did as councilor. It was me that got the gym at the school (Notre Dame de la Joie) and I bought the land for the expansion of the school. I made sure we bought the property; if you didn’t buy it back then you wouldn’t have it now. We got the lagoon system figured out; it took less than six months from when I got in. We bought the land from Hydro Quebec for $1. A lot of things are simple if you put your mind to it. I was one of the first councilors to start putting money into Parks and Recreations. The municipality started to pay to help look after them. We didn’t have any parks in the municipality at that time: just the Eardley Recreation Association. It was pretty well run and paid for by volunteers. The other six parks and skating rinks I did when I was there too.

For me there has never been a border, an issue between the wards. I have family all over [the area]. For me, this municipality has always been one municipality.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

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Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

Some might say that young people are glued to their screens all day and all night. But that's harder to say when so many bright young people are running, kicking, playing and laughing in Luskville every Monday evening.
Community soccer classes started up on Tuesday, May 1st at the Luskville Recreational Park. The two- to four year-olds play in the softball field. The older group, aged five and up, play on the soccer field to the north.

How do rural communities comply with Quebec's Organic Strategy?

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by: 

Kevin Brady

Current Situation:

The Québec residual materials management strategy includes a progressive reduction and an eventual a 'ban' of organic material from municipal landfills by 2020. Municipalities that comply with the policy are eligible for funding to help offset the costs. As with the Municipality of Pontiac, many municipalities have chosen to pass resolutions to initiate door-to-door collection, with costs paid for by the residents.

Get ready, get set, get out: disaster preparedness in a bag

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by: 

Kate Aley

Remember this?

As the Pontiac watches epic levels of flooding in both New Brunswick and B.C. and considers our own possible return to inundation, it's time to let paranoia rear its helpful head and get ready to get out of the house. The concept behind having a so-called Go Bag is to have ready everything you might need to survive, out-of-doors, for about 72 hours... until help arrives or the zombies get you.

Salon Chez Hélène celebrates 40 years in business

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by: 

Kate Aley

Hélène Belisle, owner of Salon Chez Hélène in Luskville, summarizes her work career as “forty years of doing what I like.”

Born and raised in Luskville, Belisle trained and gained work experience in Hull before opening her own salon in her home in 1978. However, her experience in hairdressing dates back to her childhood.

Pontiac Community Players put on fundraising play

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by: 

Kate Aley

A hilarious one-hour play called Maid to Order was presented in Shawville April 13 and 14 by local theatre troupe, the Pontiac Community Players (PCP). Sold-out on both evenings, the profits will go towards the Pontiac High School restoration project to update lighting, sound and add a 20-foot electronic screen to be used for both school and community movie screenings. Further improvements to seating and ventilation are planned.

Above, hapless police officers Craig Young (left) and Neil MacIntosh (right) ask the slightly-shady Charles Cambin (Richard Armitage) to explain himself.

Another community hub lost: Depanneur Poirier closes down

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by: 

Kate Aley

Depanneur Poirier, at the intersection of the highway and Ch. des Pères-Dominicains, has closed. The last day of business was Thursday 22 but the owners, Janet and Jack Deschenes have been emptying shelves for weeks.

Bunny fun: Luskville playgroup celebrates Easter

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by: 

Kate Aley

Spring is here we're told, but it's still so gray and cold outside. Where can you take your under 5's when you have exhausted all the DVD options? To the free playgroup in Luskville, of course.

Above from left, Comité 0-5 animator Lisa Corrigan with personal friend Helga the rabbit and an ardent admirer at the Luskville playgroup's Easter event.

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