Election 2017: Jean Côté

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by: 

Kate Aley

Our last profile is of Jean Côté, who is running for the position of councilor of Ward 1. It proved impossible to interview Mr. Côté in person. Our gratitude to him for emailing his answers to us.

Career

Retired as team lead, IT Program, Shared Services Canada

What are the greatest challenges you see for the municipality and/or your ward?

Challenges for the municipality and ward include improving infrastructure and roads and increasing business growth. A solid infrastructure is a prerequisite to increase business growth.  As well, there may be a need for municipal subsidies or incentives to entice businesses to the Pontiac. An industrial park, rezoning discussions and looking into provincial and federal programs for their assistance would be required.  There would be a need to identify what would best suit all parties (the municipality and businesses) and how they can work together to get things started. There are possibilities on the tourism front (a marina, museum, etc.), in the arts (local artisans and music), as well as other opportunities yet to be studied, such as an IT Centre, ski resort or outdoor center. The possibilities could be endless if we keep an open mind and are willing to discuss and research the potential. This could alleviate loss of our youth to the cities.

What would be your first priority if elected?

My priority [would be] infrastructure and roads. The rash of floods has devastated some people and properties and we must take measures to deal with this. Considering the bulk of the flooding is caused by things that are beyond our control, we could look at options such as discussing water dam management with the proper authorities and seeing if there are things that could be addressed at that stage (such as water release schedules). We need to research and identify problem areas in order to determine if preventative measures could be put in place, if only on a seasonal basis, such as shoring up certain areas in the fall in preparation for spring. A proper study of problem areas would also give us an opportunity to see if some form of diversion could be put into place where two waterways exist, in order to lessen the impact.  There is also a discussion that needs to take place concerning known flood areas and building permits for said areas, as well as outlines of responsibilities for both homeowners and the municipality.

What do you see here that is going well?

What is good now [is that] some roads are being done, and the Quyon Beach Barn/Community Centre is being addressed. The municipality of Pontiac is a rich and diverse multi-cultural area, with lineages of First Nations, Irish, English and French descent, to name a few.  As well, it is an area that abounds in talent, such as on the arts and crafts as well as music front. We have a distinct history in our contributions to industry in southern Quebec with the Ottawa River linking our area to others and facilitating transport of goods and people. These are things that we want to highlight and maintain as they are our history and our identities. It is a primarily rural area with an abundance of forests and lakes that also distinguishes the Pontiac from urban centers, as well as a beautiful place to live.

What makes you a good choice as councilor for your ward?

I am willing to work hard and am recently retired. I am bilingual, with prior experience (over nine years) as a church board member dealing with assisting in running and maintaining a church. I have experience as a supervisor and team lead within Federal Government which entails good people and leadership skills and working as a group with a specific goal in mind, i.e. client service. I think [council needs] to handle issues in an informed and logical fashion. 

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Kickin' it: Pontiac youth get into soccer

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by: 

Kate Aley

Some might say that young people are glued to their screens all day and all night. But that's harder to say when so many bright young people are running, kicking, playing and laughing in Luskville every Monday evening.
Community soccer classes started up on Tuesday, May 1st at the Luskville Recreational Park. The two- to four year-olds play in the softball field. The older group, aged five and up, play on the soccer field to the north.

How do rural communities comply with Quebec's Organic Strategy?

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by: 

Kevin Brady

Current Situation:

The Québec residual materials management strategy includes a progressive reduction and an eventual a 'ban' of organic material from municipal landfills by 2020. Municipalities that comply with the policy are eligible for funding to help offset the costs. As with the Municipality of Pontiac, many municipalities have chosen to pass resolutions to initiate door-to-door collection, with costs paid for by the residents.

Get ready, get set, get out: disaster preparedness in a bag

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by: 

Kate Aley

Remember this?

As the Pontiac watches epic levels of flooding in both New Brunswick and B.C. and considers our own possible return to inundation, it's time to let paranoia rear its helpful head and get ready to get out of the house. The concept behind having a so-called Go Bag is to have ready everything you might need to survive, out-of-doors, for about 72 hours... until help arrives or the zombies get you.

Salon Chez Hélène celebrates 40 years in business

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by: 

Kate Aley

Hélène Belisle, owner of Salon Chez Hélène in Luskville, summarizes her work career as “forty years of doing what I like.”

Born and raised in Luskville, Belisle trained and gained work experience in Hull before opening her own salon in her home in 1978. However, her experience in hairdressing dates back to her childhood.

Pontiac Community Players put on fundraising play

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by: 

Kate Aley

A hilarious one-hour play called Maid to Order was presented in Shawville April 13 and 14 by local theatre troupe, the Pontiac Community Players (PCP). Sold-out on both evenings, the profits will go towards the Pontiac High School restoration project to update lighting, sound and add a 20-foot electronic screen to be used for both school and community movie screenings. Further improvements to seating and ventilation are planned.

Above, hapless police officers Craig Young (left) and Neil MacIntosh (right) ask the slightly-shady Charles Cambin (Richard Armitage) to explain himself.

Another community hub lost: Depanneur Poirier closes down

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by: 

Kate Aley

Depanneur Poirier, at the intersection of the highway and Ch. des Pères-Dominicains, has closed. The last day of business was Thursday 22 but the owners, Janet and Jack Deschenes have been emptying shelves for weeks.

Bunny fun: Luskville playgroup celebrates Easter

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by: 

Kate Aley

Spring is here we're told, but it's still so gray and cold outside. Where can you take your under 5's when you have exhausted all the DVD options? To the free playgroup in Luskville, of course.

Above from left, Comité 0-5 animator Lisa Corrigan with personal friend Helga the rabbit and an ardent admirer at the Luskville playgroup's Easter event.

Walk right in: renovations to Family Centre ensure better, safer service

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by: 

Kate Aley

Better than a new welcome mat, a shining floor now greets visitors to the Maison de la Famille in Quyon, thanks to funding from the Ministère de la Famille. A new epoxy surface was poured last week, creating a seamless floor running though out the reception area, the Clothing Counter, kitchen and laundry.

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