Get ready, get set, get out: disaster preparedness in a bag

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by: 

Kate Aley

Remember this?

As the Pontiac watches epic levels of flooding in both New Brunswick and B.C. and considers our own possible return to inundation, it's time to let paranoia rear its helpful head and get ready to get out of the house. The concept behind having a so-called Go Bag is to have ready everything you might need to survive, out-of-doors, for about 72 hours... until help arrives or the zombies get you.

After the Ft. McMurray fires, I succumbed to my cringing inner fears and prepared a four-person Go Bag, also known as a Bug-Out Bag. Basically, this should contain all the vital components you may not have time to get together if there is ever a need to get the pets into the cages and flee before waves, flames, lava or something worse.

Here is what I got:

Some Like It Not Freezing: three dollar fleece blankets from Giant Tiger.

Feet and backs: six dollar socks from Home Hardware and seventy-five cent fleece sweaters from the Maison de la Famille.

Heads and hands: a selection of unpopular gloves and hats from our massive Bin of Gloves And Hats.

Gimme shelter: mid-sized tarp, selection of bungee cords and emergency ponchos.

Warmth and wounds: first aid and fire-lighters. To be added: flashlights and maybe flares.

Food and drink: I sure hope everyone likes trail mix.

So small, so important: the backup hard drive. To be added: scans of passports, drivers licenses, health cards and maybe the Will.

Okay, that's heavy: the assembled Go Bag. Perfect for placing calmly in the back of the Hyundai; not so much for a 1812-retreat-from-Moscow-style overland slog.

Thinking of making your own Go Bag? There are plenty of resources on-line, in varying degrees of terrified anticipation of the Apocalypse, such as:

  www.getprepared.gc.ca

  www.bugoutbagacademy.com

  www.enterprisecommunity.org

Use your common sense is my suggestion.

Get ready; good luck.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Le jour du Souvenir 2017 au cénotaphe de Quyon

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by: 

Kate Aley

translation: 

Guy Faubert

Malgré les pluies torrentielles, les habitants de Pontiac ont gardé un silence respectueux lors de la cérémonie du jour du Souvenir au Cénotaphe de Quyon le 5 novembre.

Not Lyme: woman struggles to recover after tick bite

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by: 

Kate Aley

Two months ago, Ottawa high-school teacher Julia Brown* was a healthy woman enjoying a summer day at a riverside cottage. Yet a bite from a tick nearly took her life. But it was not Lyme disease; it was something worse.

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