Get ready, get set, get out: disaster preparedness in a bag

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Kate Aley

Remember this?

As the Pontiac watches epic levels of flooding in both New Brunswick and B.C. and considers our own possible return to inundation, it's time to let paranoia rear its helpful head and get ready to get out of the house. The concept behind having a so-called Go Bag is to have ready everything you might need to survive, out-of-doors, for about 72 hours... until help arrives or the zombies get you.

After the Ft. McMurray fires, I succumbed to my cringing inner fears and prepared a four-person Go Bag, also known as a Bug-Out Bag. Basically, this should contain all the vital components you may not have time to get together if there is ever a need to get the pets into the cages and flee before waves, flames, lava or something worse.

Here is what I got:

Some Like It Not Freezing: three dollar fleece blankets from Giant Tiger.

Feet and backs: six dollar socks from Home Hardware and seventy-five cent fleece sweaters from the Maison de la Famille.

Heads and hands: a selection of unpopular gloves and hats from our massive Bin of Gloves And Hats.

Gimme shelter: mid-sized tarp, selection of bungee cords and emergency ponchos.

Warmth and wounds: first aid and fire-lighters. To be added: flashlights and maybe flares.

Food and drink: I sure hope everyone likes trail mix.

So small, so important: the backup hard drive. To be added: scans of passports, drivers licenses, health cards and maybe the Will.

Okay, that's heavy: the assembled Go Bag. Perfect for placing calmly in the back of the Hyundai; not so much for a 1812-retreat-from-Moscow-style overland slog.

Thinking of making your own Go Bag? There are plenty of resources on-line, in varying degrees of terrified anticipation of the Apocalypse, such as:

  www.getprepared.gc.ca

  www.bugoutbagacademy.com

  www.enterprisecommunity.org

Use your common sense is my suggestion.

Get ready; good luck.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Walk right in: renovations to Family Centre ensure better, safer service

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Kate Aley

Better than a new welcome mat, a shining floor now greets visitors to the Maison de la Famille in Quyon, thanks to funding from the Ministère de la Famille. A new epoxy surface was poured last week, creating a seamless floor running though out the reception area, the Clothing Counter, kitchen and laundry.

André Fortin nominated as Liberal candidate for Pontiac

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by: 

Kate Aley

The auditorium of Onslow Elementary School was filled with supporters of MNA for Pontiac André​ Fortin on Saturday March 10. The gathering marked the re-nomination of Fortin to represent the Liberal party in the upcoming provincial elections. Community members, councilors for the Municipality of Pontiac and MRC Pontiac mayors and wardens, both past and present, were in attendance.

Community coffee: church offers warm drinks and warm reception

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Kate Aley

It is indisputably still cold outside, baby.  Éric Hébert-Daly, the new student minister at Quyon United Church, has a new idea to warm all of us up. 

On Monday 12, and on every Monday from now, Hébert-Daly will be opening the doors of the church at 1088 Clarendon Street in Quyon (next to the Post Office) between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. to offer warm drinks at no charge.

Riding in style: massive upgrade to Pontiac bus route

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Kate Aley

It's smooth and it's quiet with internet access, a 36" flat screen TV and reclining seats and it leaves Allumette Island at 10 minutes to 5 am every day. This is the new coach that runs Route 148 and you can be on it. This week, riders taking the Campeau Bus Line to the city were treated to a brand-new luxury coach, a demonstration vehicle in service before the permanent vehicle becomes available in about a weeks time.

Slipping back: background facts

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by: 

Kate Aley

Welcome back. While I wait for my file on the accident (December 4) to be retrieved by the MRC des Collines police, I placed calls to two local people, experts on the trucking of manure. For those who are coming in late to this, see my previous "slippery" stories archived here.

Slippery story: the update

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Kate Aley

On Monday December 4, a serious accident was caused by some kind of slippery fluid being splashed all over the highway in Luskville. Many people commented on the unexpectedly deep puddles, the effort it took to stay on the road and the horrible stink of it. There was so much, a snow plow was called in to strip it off the road. What was that stuff? Where did it come from? I managed to find someone to talk to from the MTQ within two days. But as yet, my attempts to get information about this incident from the MRC des Collines police have been unproductive. 

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