Get ready, get set, get out: disaster preparedness in a bag

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by: 

Kate Aley

Remember this?

As the Pontiac watches epic levels of flooding in both New Brunswick and B.C. and considers our own possible return to inundation, it's time to let paranoia rear its helpful head and get ready to get out of the house. The concept behind having a so-called Go Bag is to have ready everything you might need to survive, out-of-doors, for about 72 hours... until help arrives or the zombies get you.

After the Ft. McMurray fires, I succumbed to my cringing inner fears and prepared a four-person Go Bag, also known as a Bug-Out Bag. Basically, this should contain all the vital components you may not have time to get together if there is ever a need to get the pets into the cages and flee before waves, flames, lava or something worse.

Here is what I got:

Some Like It Not Freezing: three dollar fleece blankets from Giant Tiger.

Feet and backs: six dollar socks from Home Hardware and seventy-five cent fleece sweaters from the Maison de la Famille.

Heads and hands: a selection of unpopular gloves and hats from our massive Bin of Gloves And Hats.

Gimme shelter: mid-sized tarp, selection of bungee cords and emergency ponchos.

Warmth and wounds: first aid and fire-lighters. To be added: flashlights and maybe flares.

Food and drink: I sure hope everyone likes trail mix.

So small, so important: the backup hard drive. To be added: scans of passports, drivers licenses, health cards and maybe the Will.

Okay, that's heavy: the assembled Go Bag. Perfect for placing calmly in the back of the Hyundai; not so much for a 1812-retreat-from-Moscow-style overland slog.

Thinking of making your own Go Bag? There are plenty of resources on-line, in varying degrees of terrified anticipation of the Apocalypse, such as:

  www.getprepared.gc.ca

  www.bugoutbagacademy.com

  www.enterprisecommunity.org

Use your common sense is my suggestion.

Get ready; good luck.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Our past in stone: sculpture depicts history of Pontiac

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by: 

Kate Aley

"At the Crossroads", an eight-foot tall obelisk, was officially dedicated at the Luskville Community Centre on Saturday, October 7. Each side of the monument is symbolic of the municipality’s history, showing aspects of local geology and biology, as well as the lives of First Nations people and European settlers.  

Sculpture to be unveiled this Saturday

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by: 

Kate Aley

I was lucky enough to be at the Town Hall when our new sculpture was being installed. I was determined not to take a picture of its exquisite beauty so as to not spoil the effect of its unveiling on Saturday 7th October at 1 pm.

Spoiler alert.

Culture Days exhibit the creative life

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by: 

Kate Aley

Since 1996, the Journé​es de la Culture (Culture Days) have presented admission-free creative activities which are open to all. Two local artists opened their studios to the public on September 29, 30 and October 1 in order to promote greater access to arts and culture.

Discover your creativity with free art lessons for the MoP

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by: 

Kate Aley

Print-making, collage, basketry anyone? The Municipality of Pontiac has funded nine free art lessons in Luskville, Quyon and Breckenridge to sate your artistic appetite this fall. Five teachers from local group Get Art will be teaching a variety of creative skills in three hour lessons over three Saturday afternoons in October. The classes are free and all materials and tools are provided.

The farm gate is open at the UPA Open Door event

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by: 

Kate Aley

Both country folk and city slickers came out for the 15th edition of the L'Union Producteur Agricole (UPA) Open Doors event on Sept 10. Luskville's La Riveraine, the only site within the Municipality of Pontiac, welcomed well over 100 visitors. They were able to tour the farm which dates from 1905, enjoying old machinery, tiny ponies and proud peahens, not to mention sampling some delicious pancakes.

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