Perfect waste management

Categories: 

by: 

Sheila McCrindle

There is an old saying among environmentalist “Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.”  This applies whenever solutions to environmental problems are being devised. Especially solutions involving human behaviour.  It means that just because a solution is not perfect does not mean it is not good.  Dealing with household organic waste is just such an example.

  There are definitely challenges to composting organic waste at home, but they are not insurmountable.  Plant wastes are pretty easy to compost, a decent composting bin the occasional turning over of the material in it and removal of good compost at the bottom.  Anyone who can separate their waste into a special bin and take that bin to the edge of the road is already doing the same amount of work.  But, you might ask, what about animal food scraps, bones and fat and the like, they don’t go in most composters.  And that is right, composting animal scraps is challenging and requires more expensive composting equipment.  But this is where we get to the perfect being the enemy of the good.  If it is good to home-compost plant material, is it good enough?

It is helpful to have some numbers.  Thanks to Recic-Quebec, we can look at a waste characterization study done for the MRC de Robert-Cliché, a region with characteristics similar to MoP.

The results of the study indicated that organic waste made up between 43 and 64% of the waste generated by households and 30% of the waste generated by farms.  However almost all of that material is garden waste and household waste that can be composted at home (their terminology).  The volume of waste not suitable for backyard composting ranged from 0.5% to 6% for households and was 0% for farms.

So if the vast amount of organic waste can be composted at home, why is this not the preferred solution for our Municipality?  It is seems expensive to send big trucks hundreds of kms, emitting pollution and damaging roads in order to get 1 or 2% of household waste.  Are we letting the perfect be the enemy of the good?

Coda: It is worth noting that perfect diversion rarely happens, even after years of curbside collection of recyclables about 20 – 25% of our garbage stream is material that should be in the recycle bin.

Footnote: The Waste Characterization Study for MRC de Robert-Cliché has been shared with all of the Municipal Councillors and the Mayor. If you are interested in seeing the whole report just ask one of them.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Discover delicious Pontiac: Demeter Catering at Bristol Farmers Market

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

Luskville caterer Demeter Catering has teamed up with Beechgrove lamb producer JAE Farm to offer delicious, fresh, ready-to-eat food at the Bristol Farmers’ Market. JAE Farm has produced some lovely hand-made lamb sausages that are free from fillers or preservatives. Just spices and fresh herbs compliment the pasture-raised lamb. They can be purchased grilled for immediate eating on a pita with slaw and yogurt or frozen for cooking at home.

Be strong, Pontiac: community gym coming to Quyon

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

Getting fit and staying strong is an integral part of healthy living. Now these goals will be even easier to achieve in this municipality.

Catherine Beaudet, executive director of the Quyon Maison de la Famille (QMdlF), has managed to find funding to support the creation of a community gymnasium based in Quyon.

The news was made public at the QMdlF's Annual General Meeting on June 20. Beaudet had promised a special announcement after the usual AGM  business and she certainly delivered.

Celebrating living heritage, honouring the past: National Aboriginal Day

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

Logo of the First Nations tribe in the Municipality of Pontiac.

June 21 is Canada's National Aboriginal Day (NAD), created to recognize the history, culture and contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. According to the Indigenous and Northern Affairs page of Canada.ca website, the Canadian Constitution recognizes these three groups as Aboriginal peoples, also known as Indigenous Peoples.

Pontiac 2020.ca asked Quyon's Garry Belair, Chief White Owl, now in his fifth year of leadership of the Pontiac Algonkin Outaouais tribe, to explain the significance of the day.

The Pontiac Artists' Studio Tour: Cheryl Dolan

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley


The second painter hailing from the Municipality of Pontiac on the Pontiac Artists' Associations' studio tour this year is Cheryl Dolan. She welcomed visitors to her charming Quyon home studio this weekend as part of the unique opportunity for the public to see where art is made.


A popular Tour stop, Pontiac2020.ca asked Cheryl a few questions.

Test of ESCN

Categories: 

by: 

ADMIN

translation: 

ADMIN

This is a test of the ESCN system to verify functionality.  Please delete this notice.  You will be informed by email of any new articles posted to Pontiac2020.ca -ts

Kids picnic with all the fun of the fair

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

It's sunny, the grass is green and the park is calling! Pack up your picnic basket and come to the third annual Parents of the Municipality of Pontiac (PMP) children's picnic on Saturday at the Luskville Community Centre. (The above image is from last year evidently!)

Cheers to the volunteers: breakfast club celebration

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

A good breakfast is the best way to start the day. And, every day across Canada, volunteers assemble at elementary schools at 6:30 a.m. to make sure young students get that best start.

On June 6, Le Club des petits déjeuners (The Breakfast Club) volunteers from Notre Dame de la Joie in Luskville and Ste. Marie in Quyon gathered to be rewarded with a breakfast of their own. But first they served breakfast for the kids of course!

The Pontiac Artists' Studio Tour: Marcel Renaud

Categories: 

by: 

Kate Aley

Our municipality has many hidden treasures and some of those brightly coloured gems are our visual artists.
Pontiac2020.ca asked new Artists Studio Tour member, Marcel Renaud of Breckenridge, about opening his creative space to the public for the first time.

Pages