Slippery story: the update

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Kate Aley

On Monday December 4, a serious accident was caused by some kind of slippery fluid being splashed all over the highway in Luskville. Many people commented on the unexpectedly deep puddles, the effort it took to stay on the road and the horrible stink of it. There was so much, a snow plow was called in to strip it off the road. What was that stuff? Where did it come from? I managed to find someone to talk to from the MTQ within two days. But as yet, my attempts to get information about this incident from the MRC des Collines police have been unproductive. 

The first time I called, I was transferred to the voice mail of the person handling communications. I left my name and number and a detailed message of what I wanted to know.

A week later I called again. This time I was told I would have to speak to the officer who wrote the report and was given his name. However, apparently he was a part-time officer and I could not be told when he would next be on duty. I left my name and number and a detailed description of what I wanted to know.

Yesterday I called again. This time I was asked if I had been personally involved in the accident. I said I was third on the scene. I was told that I needed to file an Access to Information request to see the report. This will cost $15 and take 20 days to produce.

I must say it is very tempting to give up right here. I mean, some stuff spilled on the highway, a guy rolled his car. The MTQ stopped looking for the source that same day. I can't even find out if the police are investigating the incident. So I guess no-one cares.

Yet these two important questions remain: what was that stinking black slippery stuff?  And: is letting filthy slippery stuff spill all over the highway a crime or not?

I think a lot about that driver, slumped in the front seat of his car. He was already starting to go into shock, his voice no more than a whisper. His van was totaled, windows smashed and stuff from the back of it scattered all over the ditch. He had a small cut in the middle of his forehead and a tiny bead of blood was beginning to trickle down from it.

That could easily have been me. It could have been any of us. I have the file number for the accident on a piece of paper in front of me.

So I guess I am not giving up.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Take step back in time as you “Savour the Pontiac”

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2013 marks the 400th anniversary of Samuel de Champlain’s passage up the Ottawa River in search of navigable waterways and this is being commemorated at the 6th edition of the local producers fair, Savour the Pontiac.

The event will see the Quyon waterfront and Lions Hall transformed into a 17th century marketplace where local business owners, artists, artisans and producers will be dressed in period costumes.

Have the amalgamation discussions gasped their last, dying breath?

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Since February of this year, every issue of the (Pontiac) Journal has published something on the topic of the MRC Pontiac’s study on the possibility of amalgamating some of its municipalities. Whether in the countless articles, letters to the editors, advertisements, and editorials, no other single topic in the Journal’s history has occupied as much newsprint space.

Pontiac: funeste fusion

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Dans le Pontiac, les francophones sont depuis plus d'un siècle menacés d'assimilation. Ils ne restent majoritaires que dans le secteur formé par les municipalités contiguës de Fort-Coulonge, Mansfield-et-Pontefract et Île-du-Grand-Calumet. Or, si la fusion envisagée des 18 municipalités de la MRC Pontiac se réalise, ce qui reste de francophonie dans l'ouest de l'Outaouais risque d'être mis en minorité pour de bon. C'est un scénario qu'il faut à tout prix écarter!

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