Agriculture/Farming

Agriculture dans la municipalité de Pontiac - Agriculture and farming in the Municipality of Pontiac

Partenariat transpacifique: Québec interpelle Ottawa sur l’agriculture

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Le Devoir  26 mai 2015 par Éric Desrosiers

Québec dit craindre que son agriculture fasse les frais d’une conclusion imminente des négociations du Partenariat transpacifique (PTP) et presse le premier ministre canadien, Stephen Harper, d’honorer sa promesse de défendre le système de gestion de l’offre.

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La hausse de la valeur des terres agricoles n’est pas aussi marquée en 2014, selon un rapport de FAC

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In English: Farmland values increase not as steep in 2014, FCC report says

Regina (Saskatchewan) – La valeur moyenne des terres agricoles au Canada continue d’augmenter, mais la hausse n’était pas aussi marquée en 2014 que l’année précédente, tant à l’échelle nationale que dans de nombreuses régions agricoles importantes, selon le plus récent rapport Valeur des terres agricoles de Financement agricole Canada (FAC).

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Budget 2015-2016 : des coupes dangereuses dans le secteur agricole

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Longueuil, le 26 mars 2015 — L’Union des producteurs agricoles (UPA) qualifie de dangereuses les coupes de 14,5% dans le secteur agricole. L’insécurité ainsi créée pourrait avoir des impacts désastreux sur les décisions d’investissement des producteurs agricoles.

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Protecting Canada’s farmland, the right way

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Breckenridge Creek, Municipality of Pontiac, Québec.  (Image ©Thomas Soulière 2014)

macleans.ca

November 20, 2014 — Canada was once a country of farms. At Confederation, four out of every five Canadians were farmers. Today, farmers comprise less than two per cent of the population and produce a mere 1.1 per cent of GDP. Should it come as any surprise that the amount of farmland in Canada is shrinking, as well?

Last week, Statistics Canada released a comprehensive look at agriculture in Canada, bringing together the latest economic, geographic and ecological indicators. The most noteworthy observation: Nearly one million hectares of “dependable agricultural land” has disappeared from cultivation over the past 10 years, most of it subsumed by development around Canada’s biggest cities.

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Urban sprawl is destroying Ontario’s farmland

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The view from midway up the Luskville Falls Trail in the Gatineau Park looking south east over the center of the Municipality of Pontiac, Québec.  (Image ©Thomas Souliére 2013)


By: David Suzuki and Faisal Moola
© Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd. 1996-2015

Despite its huge area, Canada has relatively little dependable farmland. Good soil and a friendly climate are hard to find. So it seems like good news that on a clear day you can see about half the best agricultural land in Canada from the top of Toronto’s CN Tower. If we’re to feed our growing urban populations, having food lands close to where people live will be critical to sustaining local food security.

Some regions of the country, like the Golden Horseshoe surrounding Toronto, have been blessed with an abundance of Class 1 soils. But an increasing proportion of the best soils in the Golden Horseshoe and in most urbanized regions of Canada now lie beneath sprawling housing developments, highways, strip malls and other infrastructure. As urban communities have grown over the years, agricultural lands and natural areas have far too often been drained, dug up and paved over.

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Bilan de l'assurance récolte 2014 : région de l'Outaouais

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GATINEAU, QC, le 17 févr. 2015 /CNW Telbec
La Financière agricole du Québec dresse un portrait de l'assurance récolte 2014 pour la région de l'Outaouais. Ainsi, La Financière agricole a versé, en date du 9 février 2015, aux 43 entreprises ayant subi des pertes indemnisables, des sommes totalisant 197 000 dollars dont près de 178 000 dollars pour les céréales, le maïs et les protéagineuses. Pour l'année d'assurance 2014, 368 entreprises agricoles de la région étaient assurées au programme pour des valeurs représentant 19 millions de dollars.

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End the Food Wars: Let’s Fight for Understanding Instead

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Rob Wallbridge

I can’t really tell if it was the “packed with pesticides” or the “bashing mom bashes good” phrase that finally made me realize what was wrong.

It wasn’t long after I became active on Twitter that I began to question some of my long-held assumptions about GMOs and “conventional” agriculture. I had always been a critic of GMO technology, based on a broad range on concerns and backed by what I considered solid evidence and sound arguments. But on-line I found a community of scientists, farmers, journalists and others who were passionate about good research, sound reasoning and logical thinking on agricultural issues. And their conclusions were often at odds with mine. Seeing their evidence, I was forced to re-evaluate and modify a number of my positions.

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