Environment

Contenu concernant les préoccupations environnementales et les questions - Content concerning environmental concerns and issues

Got Milkweed?: natural resource to become local industry

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Kate Aley

Generally considered a pleasing wildflower at best and an annoying and insidious weed at worst, common North American Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) is about to be reborn as a profitable, wild-harvested crop. What hasn’t changed is its indisputable role as the single food source for the incredible and tenacious Monarch Butterfly.

Bringing about this renaissance in the Outaouais is a new non-profit organisation, Nature Atout (NA), based in Wakefield.

Wild Parsnip: is this the one we are all supposed to be freaking out about?

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by: 

Kate Aley

In short, no.

The massive invasive toxic weed we are supposed to fear and loathe is Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum).Originally from eastern Europe and imported as a decorative garden accent, if you can believe it, Giant Hogweed grows to about five meters tall and is filled with noxious sap that burns skin deeply.

Shellback safety: please look out for turtles

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by: 

Kate Aley

It's the height of summer and turtles are getting all maternal. The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) are raising awareness of these beautiful creatures' seasonal need to crawl around on the side of the road -- and occasionally lurch their way across it -- with their Carapace initiative. Visit carapace.ca to learn about how to report the sighting of a turtle - live or dead -- along the highway. The NCC uses this information to identify what kind of turtles live in the area and to plan ways to protect them. Pick up a sticker at your local depanneur and help educate your friends and neighbours.

Garden enemy number one: the rose chafer

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by: 

Kate Aley

The first time I saw a rose chafer flying past me, I was actually charmed. So small, so funny, bumbling through the air with an almost velvet-like olive coloured carapace contrasting nicely with comically splayed-out shiny orange legs. That was then.

 

People, get ready: planning for disaster as a community

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by: 

Kate Aley

We all know that being prepared for an unexpected emergency as individuals is vital. How to be prepared as a community seems less clear. I asked communications agent Dominic Labrie about what we now have in place to help keep the people of Pontiac safe.


Pontiac2020.ca: Does the Municipality currently have a disaster plan?

Municipality of Pontiac (MoP): Yes, right now it is in phase 1.

P2020: When was it created?

Young trees, sure to please

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by: 

Kate Aley

Two hundred trees were given away at the Town Hall on Friday, May 20 to mark tree-planting month. Or something like that.

Red pines, red oaks and sugar maple saplings were on offer, grown by the Ministry of Natural Resources and sourced by the MRC des Collines. Director Ben Kuhn (pictured here with a tray of pines ... it was very bright that day) and communications officer Dominic Labrie were on hand to hand out the free trees. 

Pontiac frogs get thumbs-up from NCC

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by: 

Kate Aley

National Capital Commission (NCC) students Karine Labelle (left) and Valerie Bertrand were assessing the population of Western Chorus frogs along Ch. Pilon in Luskville this week. The two University of Ottawa biology students have the enviable task of travelling around the region to visit known breeding grounds, listening for the calls of 10 types of amphibians, including the Wood frog and American toad.

 

Danger, stranger

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As an Australian, the fire danger safety sign is a holy and unquestionable symbol of authority that stands between the community and unspeakable devastation.

Did you know that, as a result of a number of particularly deadly fires, the state of Victoria now has a 'black' rating?

Red denotes 'extreme'. So, the level of danger the colour black designates?

Wakefield Earth Day program offers green development insights

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Wakefield Earth Day has an interesting program this year for those interested in green development. It takes place Friday, April 23rd and Saturday, April 24th at Wakefield Centre, 38 chemin de la Vallée de Wakefield.

Some highlights (courtesy of Mari Wesche):

Friday, April 23:

5:30 - 7 p.m. -  Discussion of green development in Wakefield South by C. Minnes and architect D. Cardinal

7 - 9 p.m.  -  WIFF screening of Avi Lewis' (+ Naomi Klein's) film, This Changes Everything, plus discussion with local green entrepreneurs. (Tickets available on-line, $10)

Saturday, April 23:

We got frogs: welcome back WCF

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by: 

Kate Aley

You can hear them as you cruise along with your windows down: the brisk "rrrk! rrrk!" call of the Western Chorus frog.

Considered a threatened species due to habitat loss, Pseudacris triseriata is a snazzy little fellow, all greeny-brown with 'go-faster' stripes; but you are never going to see one, no matter how quietly you creep up. They are astonishingly good at falling silent at the slightest footstep.

Update: Unidentified lying barrels

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by: 

Kate Aley

Five metal 44-gallon drums, discovered dumped at the end of Ch. Therien in Luskville weeks ago, are still in place.

Update: On April 12, Jasmine Leduc, strategic communications advisor with the NCC, updated Pontiac2020 on the situation. NCC conservation officers have now visited the site to ascertain whether the barrels are in a suitable state to be removed, which they are.

The officers then worked to identify the contents, finding solvents, paint, oil and resins. Further investigation is needed to determine the specific type of resin, after which the barrels will be removed, at latest by the end of next week.

Consultation publique CCN / NCC Public Consultation 25-04-2016

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NCC Consultations CCNLa CCN souhaite consulter les citoyens de la municipalité de Pontiac concernant un projet d’amé...

Posted by Municipalité de Pontiac / Municipality of Pontiac on Friday, April 1, 2016

This Omnivore's Dilemma: Pontiac Style

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In my younger years I tried to be a vegetarian. I was embracing the back-to-the-land dream of self-sufficiency, earth sheltered houses, that sort of thing. I tried cooking my way through the Moosewood Cookbook and indeed there are delicious recipes in there that I still use. But inevitably I would go to my parents’ for dinner.

Deer Xing

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by: 

Kate Aley

It's spring in the Pontiac and that means mud, maple and deer trying to get across the road at all times of the day and night.

For every amusing anecdote recalling a group of deer standing obediently at a stop sign looking left and right, there is the gory evidence of those who have evidently not checked for oncoming traffic. Hitting a deer is going to ruin your day, and his as well.

Terres à vendre

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Faut-il s'inquiéter de l'intérêt des investisseurs pour les terres agricoles ?

Entrevue avec Charles-Félix Ross, économiste en chef, UPA.

 

Terres à vendre.Faut-il s'inquiéter de l'intérêt des investisseurs pour les terres agricoles ?Entrevue avec Charles-Félix Ross, économiste en chef, UPA.

Posted by RDI Économie on Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Predicting change: Polls vs. reality

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Bulletin d'Aylmer

As I write this column, the October 19 election is pending, so I have no idea who Canada’s Prime Minister will be. At this point, polls indicate a Liberal minority government. However, polls are inconclusive – as are pundits’ predictions.

Intriguingly, pollsters primarily contact land line users: cell-phone and social-media polling is still in its infancy. This means that polls may not reflect opinions of a vast group of Canadians – and in particular, the youth vote.

It will be fascinating to see the denouement on October 19, when predictions morph into reality. Similarly, predictions concerning climate change are equally challenging.

. . .

L’abolition de la gestion de l’offre menacerait 24 000 emplois, selon une étude

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L'actualité

L’abolition intégrale du système canadien de la gestion de l’offre menacerait 4500 à 6000 fermes et pourrait faire disparaître jusqu’à 24 000 emplois directs au pays, avance une nouvelle étude commandée par Agropur.

Préoccupée par les négociations entourant l’accord de libre-échange du Partenariat transpacifique (PTP), la coopérative québécoise a mandaté le cabinet Boston Consulting Group (BCG) afin qu’il se penche sur les conséquences de ce scénario.

«On constate que jusqu’à 40 pour cent de la production laitière canadienne serait à risque advenant la fin de la gestion de l’offre et sans adaptation préalable», peut-on lire dans l’enquête de 56 pages.

. . .

Local Clusters of Self-Reliance: The Key to Rural Prosperity

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"If you’re a smart rural community, start with what your residents are already spending their money on."



Eardley Escarpment in the Municipality of Pontiac, Québec

By Michael H. Shuman

At a time when daily headlines bring worse and worse news about the plight of rural economies, it's worth reminding ourselves that success is possible.

Last autumn, Marian Burros of the New York Times wrote a piece about how the 3,000-person community of Hardwick, Vermont, has prospered by creating a new "economic cluster" around local food. Cutting-edge restaurants, artisan cheese makers, and organic orchardists turning fruit into exquisite pies are just some of the new businesses that have added an estimated 75-100 jobs to the area in recent years. A new Vermont Food Venture Center hopes to accelerate this creation of enterprises.

. . .

Protéger les terres et défendre les droits des producteurs : un devoir pour l’Union des producteurs agricoles

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L’Union des producteurs agricoles (UPA) et Hydro-Québec TransÉnergie ont récemment signé le protocole qui entérine la seconde révision de l’entente entre les deux organisations sur le passage des lignes de transport en milieux agricole et forestier.

Il faut rappeler que les producteurs agricoles et forestiers bénéficient depuis 1986 d’une entente négociée entre l’UPA et Hydro-Québec. Cette entente vise à optimiser la localisation des lignes de transport d’électricité et des postes sur les terres, à réduire les impacts lors de la construction de ces infrastructures et lors des travaux d’entretien, et à compenser équitablement les désagréments et pertes de récolte occasionnés par l’implantation d’un projet donné sur les propriétés.

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Avis Public Quartier 4 - Public Notice Ward 4

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À TOUS LES RÉSIDENTS, GENS D’AFFAIRES ET ASSOCIATIONS DU SECTEUR DE LUSKVILLE (QUARTIER ÉLECTORAL # 4) DE LA MUNICIPALITÉ

Monsieur le maire Roger Larose et votre conseillère Madame Inès Pontiroli vous invitent cordialement à une rencontre.

Cette rencontre a pour but de réunir tous les citoyens du quartier, à se rencontrer et échanger dans une atmosphère conviviale et informelle avec leur maire et leur conseiller.

Venez partager avec nous vos besoins, demandes, idées ou suggestions pour le développement et le mieux-être de notre beau quartier.

Centre communautaire secteur Luskville (2024 Route 148) le jeudi, 26 juin 2014 à 19:30 heures


TO ALL RESIDENTS, BUSINESS PEOPLE AND ASSOCIATIONS OF THE LUSKVILLE SECTOR (WARD #4) OF THE MUNICIPALITY

The mayor, Mr. Roger Larose and your councillor Mrs Inès Pontiroli, cordially invite you to a meeting.

The purpose of this meeting is to gather the citizens of ward 4 to meet and exchange ideas with their mayor and councillor in a friendly and informal atmosphere.

Come share your needs, requests, ideas or suggestions for the development and welfare of our beautiful community.

Luskville community centre (2024 Route 148) at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 26th 2014

 

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