Agriculture/Farming

Agriculture dans la municipalité de Pontiac - Agriculture and farming in the Municipality of Pontiac

Workshop training: Setting your prices for your food products and services

Catégories: 

par: 

Charles Séguin — Table agroalimentaire de l’Outaouais

Lately we’ve been hearing a lot of producers and food processors questioning themselves on how much they should set their prices for both their agritourism rates and product prices. In response to this, we have created a Workshop to help you better do this.

This is a workshop training invitation for everyone working or interested in the agri-food sector.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any other questions or comments.

Recensement d'oiseaux, lundi le 2 janvier 2017

Catégories: 

par: 

Mo Laidlaw

 

Bonjour! Bonne année !

I hope you have had a Merry Christmas!

Encore une fois c’est le temps pour notre recensement locale (Breckenridge-Dunrobin). Si vous avez une mangeoire d'oiseaux (avec nourriture) dans votre cours arrière, svp recensiez les oiseaux présents le 2 janvier. Vous n'avez que indiquer à la fin de la journée le nombre total d'individus (maximum) de chaque espèce présente en même temps. Vous pouvez communiquer vos résultats par courriel à moi, avant 17h.

Happy harvesters at Lavender Ridge vendage

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

Many hands made light work at Lavender Ridge winery's 6th annual vendage: also rapidly becoming known as the best harvest party ever. Excluding 2015 when a late frost meant no harvest at all, Lavender Ridge owners Joanne Labadie and Doug Briden have laid on a massive feast for their willing workers every year. October 9th was no exception, with harvesters aged from six to over 60 happy to get into the grapes.

Rip, zip and away: Rebecca's Horse Blanket Repair at your service

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

As all horse-owners well know, to their constant dismay, it takes a determined quadruped a mere moment to pull a buckle off a winter blanket or to completely tear a flysheet apart in the back paddock.

Equine equipment is too expensive to keep replacing, but luckily help is at hand from Rebecca Leblanc, pictured here with Indy, wearing a custom-made neck-piece for the Lope for Hope event last week.

Official opening of Pontiac Farmer's Store

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

Although the doors have actually been open for months, Le Magazin du Fermier /The Farmer’s Store in Luskville celebrated its Grand Opening on September 17 with a free BBQ, giveaways and snacks for all.

Jasmin Gibeau, general director for Agrodor’s Outaouais region, was on hand to welcome customers both new and established.

The garden Siri built: straw bales lift vegie production to new heights

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

Those who love summer veggies know that raised gardens are easier to tend and that heavy mulching with straw helps to keep weeds down and hold precious moisture in the soil… but what happens when you build your raised beds with straw? This year Siri Ingebrigsten, of Avant-Garde Equestrian Farm in Luskville, found out. Pontiac 2020.ca asked her about her horticultural adventure.

Quyon garlic farm has appetite for success

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

Seeking an easily-managed crop with minimal waste and a long shelf life, Quyon farmers Anny Bourret and Christian Legere chose to grow garlic and the results have been delicious. The couple now produce seven kinds of garlic on their 50 acre farm, which they purchased 12 years ago and renamed Ranch de la Vallée.

Got Milkweed?: natural resource to become local industry

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

Generally considered a pleasing wildflower at best and an annoying and insidious weed at worst, common North American Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) is about to be reborn as a profitable, wild-harvested crop. What hasn’t changed is its indisputable role as the single food source for the incredible and tenacious Monarch Butterfly.

Bringing about this renaissance in the Outaouais is a new non-profit organisation, Nature Atout (NA), based in Wakefield.

Wild Parsnip: is this the one we are all supposed to be freaking out about?

Catégories: 

par: 

Kate Aley

In short, no.

The massive invasive toxic weed we are supposed to fear and loathe is Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum).Originally from eastern Europe and imported as a decorative garden accent, if you can believe it, Giant Hogweed grows to about five meters tall and is filled with noxious sap that burns skin deeply.

Pages

S'abonner à RSS - Agriculture/Farming