Election 2017: Garry Dagenais

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Kate Aley

Our next profile is with Garry Dagenais, running to become councilor for Ward 2.

Born, raised

Born and raised in Beechgrove.

Profession

Office manager at L&J Towing.

Previous experience on council

I was councilor for Ward 4 for 7 years, beginning 2008.

What is the greatest challenge facing the Municipality?

The lack of communication by council. There’s no harmonization in this municipality. Big time. It’s a problem that council creates, we don’t seem to have harmony on council and without that, trust me, you don’t go forward too fast. When I was council, I sat in the middle; I was the deciding vote for a lot of stuff. It’s not just this current council; there’s always been a division between the wards. We need good leadership, good councilors who are actually there for the right reasons. If you are going run for council, you have to run for the people; your personal agenda can’t be for your gain, it has to be for the municipality.

If elected, what is the first thing you would like to do?

Work on infrastracuture, including the water and sewers [...] and our roads: they need to be upgraded. My previous experience on council will help with finding funds. We still struggle with [Quyon's water] as it was never planned out right; the whole infrastructure was not planned. If we have a water break, [we] do not have shut-off valves for each street. If there’s a break, we need to shut down the whole town to fix it. It’s not a simple fix: the sewer lines are 50 years old, there has never been any major upgrade in all that time. A lot of the paved roads have not been maintained. But it goes hand in hand: are you going to spend a lot of money until you fix water and sewers? [We must] decide on the priorities.

What is going right in this area?

[We are] starting to work with the NCC and our officials, Andre Fortin and Will Amos. That has changed; we are starting to be able to work together to get a lot of improvements. We never seemed to get any progress, no matter who was there before; we seem to have better communication between our elected officials now. I think that we should be able to get more funding for the municipality so long as they understand what we need. Priorities need to be made clear [to them]. Even with the MRC (des Collines), [there was] a lack of communication the long term, especially on Schema and getting stuff done for our municipality. That has been improving.

Why did you decide to run for council again?

My passion. Simple. It’s my community, I believe in it. We can develop this [place] but need the right people with passion who are willing to put time into it.  I ran for council the first time as I had always volunteered in the municipality and I figured I could make better changes by running for council. My record stands on what I did as councilor. It was me that got the gym at the school (Notre Dame de la Joie) and I bought the land for the expansion of the school. I made sure we bought the property; if you didn’t buy it back then you wouldn’t have it now. We got the lagoon system figured out; it took less than six months from when I got in. We bought the land from Hydro Quebec for $1. A lot of things are simple if you put your mind to it. I was one of the first councilors to start putting money into Parks and Recreations. The municipality started to pay to help look after them. We didn’t have any parks in the municipality at that time: just the Eardley Recreation Association. It was pretty well run and paid for by volunteers. The other six parks and skating rinks I did when I was there too.

For me there has never been a border, an issue between the wards. I have family all over [the area]. For me, this municipality has always been one municipality.

Nos autres nouvelles / Our other News

Warming up for Christmas at the Santa Claus Parade

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Kate Aley

Once more the Quyon Lions' Club Santa Claus Parade, held Saturday December 9, was a great success. Warmly-dressed families lined the streets to enjoy the decorated floats, horses and of course, St. Nick himself. As the Beach Barn is conspicuously absent this year, the parade's normal route was reversed, with participants gathering at the Ste. Marie's Catholic church parking lot and walking down the hill to the intersection with Clarendon. From there, the parade continued to the Onslow Elementary School gym where hot food and drinks were served as kids lined up to speak to Santa about a few important matters.

Slippery sh*t: unidentified effluent causes accident

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Kate Aley

A serious single-vehicle roll-over was caused early morning on December 4 by a deep slick of some kind of waste matter spilled on Highway 148 near Parker Road in Luskville. Pools of what appeared to be septic waste or liquid animal manure were at least two or three meters in length and possibly 4 cm in depth, according to witnesses.

Christmas House Tour lights up the night

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Kate Aley

The houses on the Quyon Pastoral Charge Christmas House Tour warmly received 150 visitors this year. Five family homes in Quyon and Luskville were decorated to perfection to the appreciation of all. Above, the Draper homestead in Luskville.

Scheer in Pontiac: We shouldn’t let the politics of envy divide one group of Canadians against another

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Thomas Soulière

SHAWVILLE — The leader of the Conservative Party of Canada spent the first day of December visiting the federal riding of Pontiac with stops in Campbell’s Bay, Fort Coulonge and Shawville to speak to farmers, small business owners and voters about the CPC’s position on the Liberal government’s tax policy and to show the Conservative’s strong support of supply management.

It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas: Luskville craft bazaar

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Kate Aley

Slippery driving and chilly weather did not deter participants from attending the annual craft bazaar and breakfast event at the Luskville Community Centre on Sunday, November 19th.

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